Mammals of Florida

Order

Family

Common Name

Species Name

Status

Distribution

Mammal Image Library #s

Mammalian Species #

IUCN Status

Introduced

Diet

Biome

Notes

FL Notes

FL Citations

Rodentia Muridae Woodland Vole Microtus pinetorum Lower Risk Temperate deciduous forest zone of E USA - eastern shoreline from S Maine to NC Florida, west to C Wisconsin and E Texas; isolated population on the Edwards Plateau, C Texas, may be extinct   147         Mainly subterranean; makes burrows under leaf litter or in shallow soil, only emerging to race to another burrow. Lives in small family groups and is usually monogamous. Habitat is deciduous forest with thick leaf litter, grassy patches in woodlands or orchards and dense brush. Favors areas with sandy soils.    
Rodentia Muridae Round-tailed Muskrat Neofiber alleni Lower Risk Most of peninsular Florida, extralimitally in extreme SE Georgia and Florida panhandle   15         Crepuscular or nocturnal. Less aquatic than Common Muskrat, but swims well and takes to water if alarmed. Lives in grassy marshes, salt savannahs and wet agricultural areas.    
Rodentia Muridae Eastern Woodrat Neotoma floridana U.S ESA - Endangered as N. f. smalli; IUCN - Endangered as N. f. smalli, Lower Risk (nt) as N. f. baileyi and N. f. haematoreia, otherwise Lower Risk (lc) SC and SE USA from EC Colorado to C Texas, eastwards to the Atlantic seaboard, from S North Carolina to peninsular Florida; isolated population on Florida Keys (smalli) 1016 139         Active year-round, but may stay in its house in bad weather. Climbs well and is semi-arboreal. Habitat is variable; includes bluffs and rocky areas, swamps and hammocks, forested uplands and dry scrub pine. Key Largo woodrat is vulnerable to extinction Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Rodentia Muridae Golden Mouse Ochrotomys nuttalli Lower Risk SE USA, from SE Missouri across to E West Virginia and S Virginia, south to E Texas, the Gulf Coast and C Florida 1647 75         Semi-arboreal; climbs among vines and dense thickets using its semi-prehensile tail for balance. In addition to baseball-sized nests used by a single adult, sometimes makes larger nests occupied by a group of 8 or more. Habitat is forested areas with dense tangles of briars, vines and brush; most common in floodplains.    
Rodentia Muridae Common Muskrat Ondatra zibethicus Data Deficient as O. z. ripensis, otherwise Lower Risk (lc) North America, north to the tree line, including Newfoundland; south to the Gulf of Mexico, Rio Grande and lower Colorado River valleys. Introduced to Czech Republic in 1905 and now widespread in the Palearctic, including C and N Europe, most of Ukraine, Russia and Siberia, adjacent parts of Mongolia and scattered through China, NE Korea, and Honshu Island, Japan; also into southernmost Argentina 1162, 1163 141         Mainly nocturnal, but also active on overcast or rainy days; more likely to be seen by day than other large semiaquatic rodents. Swims well and is more buoyant than a beaver. Habitat is shallow marshes with abundant cattails; less common along streams or in wooded swamps.    
Rodentia Muridae Coues' Oryzomys Oryzomys couesi Lower Risk Extreme S Texas; Mexico, excluding NC plateau region, south through most of Central America, to NW Colombia; including Jamaica, Isla Cozumel, and allopatric populations in S Baja California Sur and WC Sonora             Semi-aquatic; swims well and usually dives into water if disturbed. Sometimes seen at night swimming in deep water at some distance from land. Lives in cattail and bulrush marshes, wet grassy areas near oxbow lakes in Texas; brackish or fresh water. Found in other habitats farther south, but almost always near water.    
Rodentia Muridae Cotton Deermouse Peromyscus gossypinus U.S. ESA - Endangered as P. g. allapaticola; IUCN - Extinct as P. g. restrictus, Vulnerable as P. g. allapaticola, otherwise Lower Risk (lc) SE USA, fro SE Oklahoma, extreme S Illinois and SE Virginia, southwards, skirting the S Appalachians, to E Texas, the Gulf States, and peninsular Florida 677, 678 70         Climbs and swims well. Eats a variety of plant and animal foods. Prefers wet forests, hammocks and swamps; also found in pine woods, thickets and rocky bluffs.    
Rodentia Muridae White-footed Deermouse Peromyscus leucopus Data Deficient as P. l. ammodytes, otherwise Lower Risk S Alberta to S Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia, Canada; throughout much of C and E USA, excluding Florida; southwards to N Durango and along Caribbean coast to Isthmus of Tehuantepec and NW Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico 73, 251, 1174 247         Mainly terrestrial, but climbs well and may forage or nest well above the ground. Swims well, occupies many islands in lakes. Habitat is deciduous and mixed forests, hedgerows, brushy areas, croplands and dry semidesert regions in the Southwest.    
Rodentia Muridae Oldfield Deermouse Peromyscus polionotus U.S. ESA - Endangered as P. p. allophrys, P. p. ammobates, P. p. peninsularis, P. p. phasma and P. p. trissyllepsis, Threatened as P. p. niveiventris; IUCN - Extinct as P. p. decoloratus, Critically Endangered as P. p. trissyllepsis, Endangered as P. p. a SE USA, from SC Tennessee to W South Carolina, south through Alabama and Georgia, to panhandle and N peninsular Florida             Makes narrow burrows that it may plug from inside during the day. Apparently forms stable monogamous pairs. Lives in sand dunes, open sandy areas, early successional fields (oldfields), and dry scrub. several subspecies of beach mouse are recognized Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Rodentia Muridae Florida Deermouse Podomys floridanus Vulnerable. Considered threatened by Florida agencies due to disappearance of scrub habitat Allopatric segments in panhandle and peninsular Florida, USA 879 427         More fossorial than most deermice, constructing small tunnels within Gopher Tortoise burrows.  Lives in dry upland areas with sandy soils dominated by scrub oaks, slash pine, or longleaf pine. usually associated with gopher tortoise burrows in sandy, upland habitats Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Rodentia Muridae Eastern Harvest Mouse Reithrodontomys humulis Lower Risk SE USA, from E Oklahoma and E Texas eastwards to the Atlantic seaboard, from S Maryland to peninsular Florida 685 565         Feeds on small seeds of grasses and weeds, also moth larvae and insects. Makes a ball-shaped nest of grass and plant fibers in low vegetation. Lives in oldfields, waste ground, and ditches or other wet areas, also broom sedge and brier patches; seldom found in forests.    
Rodentia Muridae Hispid Cotton Rat Sigmodon hispidus Lower Risk (nt) as S. h. eremicus and S. h. insulicola, otherwise Lower Risk (lc) SE USA, from S Nebraska to C Virginia and south to SE Arizona and peninsular Florida; NW Chihuahua to N Tamaulipas, south through interior Mexico at least to C Zacatecas and W San Luis Potosi 76, 1177           Mainly crepuscular, but can be active at any time. Broad distribution, abundance and daytime activity make this one of the more conspicuous small rodents. Habitat is tall-grass prairies, meadows, agricultural areas and oldfields; favors areas with dense vegetation but also occurs in mesquite desert with little ground cover.    
Rodentia Sciuridae Eastern fox squirrel Sciurus niger   Texas north to Manitoba, east to the Atlantic Coast. 96, 880, 1644, 1645 479   introduced population       usually restricted to longleaf pine forests; often partially black Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Rodentia Muridae House Mouse Mus musculus Lower risk Every state in the United States. 92, 754                
Rodentia Muridae Brown Rat Rattus norvegicus Lower risk Scattered across the United States but very scarce, in not absent, from the Rocky Mountains (might looks this way because of sampling effort). 755, 756, 757, 758                
Rodentia Muridae Roof Rat Rattus rattus Lower risk Distributed around the outside of the country.  Not many records of this species being collected in the interior of the country (this might be because of sampling effort). 759, 760                
Rodentia Geomyidae Southeastern Pocket Gopher Geomys pinetus Extinct as G. p. goffi; Vulnerable as G. p. cumberlandius and G. p. frontanelus; Lower Risk as G. p. colonus, otherwise Lower Risk. Central Florida to southern Georgia and southern Alabama. 1244 86           nocturnal; great gliders (volant) Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Rodentia Sciuridae Southern flying squirrel Glaucomys volans   Eastern half f the United States from southern Canada to Florida. 1021, 1022 78 Least concern       subspecies G. v. saturates occurs throughout; G. v. texensis possibly occurs in extreme SW corner; G. v. volans possibly occurs in extreme northern counties the common backyard squirrel Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Rodentia Sciuridae Eastern gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis   Eastern Texas north to Saskatchewan Canada and east to the Atlantic Coast. 94, 95 480 Least concern       subspecies is S. c. carolinensis Slide symbol: B -- specialized behavior; C -- Close-up of head region .Becoming more common throughout state Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Carnivora Canidae Eastern Coyote Canis latrans Common Throughout continental US. 265 (C), 1126, 1127 (B), 1267 79         Larger than western coyote. Slyde symbol: C -- Close-up of head region; P -- unusual color phase. Established only as a captive breeding population Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Carnivora Canidae Red Wolf Canis rufus Endangered Southeastern states. 264 (CP), 1292 22         Presently recognized as a subspecies of Canis lupus.  Like the southeastern Canadian wolf, the red wolf is thought by some to be a hybrid between grey wolves and coyotes. Slide symbol: W -- female with young; Y -- young, may be newborn. Considered a protected species by the State Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Carnivora Canidae Red Fox Vulpes vulpes Common Throughout the US except in the southwest. 435 (W), 436 (Y), 582 537         This species helps keep small mammal populations in check; white tail tip.    
Carnivora Canidae Grey Fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus Common Nationwide except for the northwest. 584 189         Black dorsal stripe on tail; climbs trees. Slide symbol: C -- Close-up of head region. S -- skull. Populations on national forests and some other large, managed areas; individuals and small groups exist in other areas Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Carnivora Ursidae Black Bear Ursus americanus Common Northeast, Great Lakes region, Appalachians, Arkansas and west; Alaska and northern Canada but absent in Nevada and Great Plains.  Southern distributions spotty into Mexico. 142 (C),1132 (S) 647         Usually not aggressive. Adults climb trees.   Black color most common, cinnamon and white phases also exist.    
Carnivora Mustelidae Long-tailed weasel Mustela frenata Common Southwestern Canada, everywhere south of Canada/US border to South America except arid desert areas of southwest US and northwest Mexico. 1348 570         Prefers rodents, but feeds on a broad array of small vertebrates.  Agile swimmer.  Northern populations vary in color seasonally, but not southern populations.    
Carnivora Mustelidae American Mink Neovison vison Common Alaska and contiguous 48 states, except for arid west and southwest. 1129 608         Though taken for their fur, ranched mink have relieved the pressure on wild ones.  Mink eat crayfish, fish, frogs, and small rodents along with any other animals they can capture and kill.    
Carnivora Mustelidae Northern River Otter Lontra canadensis Common in the northern part of its range, uncommon to extirpated in southern parts of its range. Alaska and most of the continental US except for much of the southwestern continental US. 802 (A), 859 (W) 587         Playful, likes to slide on the snow.  Eats fish and other aquatic or amphibious animals.    
Carnivora Mephitidae Eastern Spotted Skunk Spilogale putorius Unknown Central and southeastern continental US.   511         Other than what is known about skunks in general, not much is known about this species specifically.    
Carnivora Mephitidae Striped Skunk Mephitis mephitis Common Throughout continental US except a small area in southern California, Nevada, and Arizona. 280 173         Sometimes de-scented and kept as pets (not recommended).  Good "mouser" and will use cat litter boxes.    
Carnivora Procyonidae Raccoon Procyon lotor Common Common throughout US except portions of California, Arizona, and New Mexico. 140, 709 (S) 119         Raccoons are extremely adaptable and can live in a wide range of temperatures.  They are found virtually anywhere there is water.  Their diet is extremely varied including plant and animal material.  The forefeet of raccoons end in highly sensitive hand-l    
Carnivora Felidae Bobcat Lynx rufus Rare or common, depending on geographic region. All of contiguous US, except for parts of California, Utah, Colorado,  agricultural areas of the midwest and coastal areas of the midAtlantic states. 819, 1293 563         As with the Canada lynx, bobcats are very secretive and seldom observed even in areas it occupies.  Slightly smaller than the lynx, it is capable of taking adult white-tailed deer.  Though mainly a carnivore,  areas a large array of plant and animal mater becoming more common in suburban areas where it is becoming a nuisance Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Artiodactyla Cervidae White-tailed Deer Odocoileus virginianus Common Throughout North America, except northern Canada and very arid areas of western US. 1313 388           populations in Collier Co. (southwest peninsula) listed by State as Species-of-Special-Concern  
Soricomorpha Soricidae Southern short-tailed shrew Blarina carolinensis Least concern Southeastern corner of the United States.  Occurs as far west as eastern Texas and eastern Arkansas; as far north as southern Missouri and southern Illinoios; south to central Florida; north to southern Virginia.  Distribution does not extend far into Appalachian mountains. 20, 644 673              
Soricomorpha Soricidae Everglades short-tailed shrew Blarina penninsulae                 Some question as to species status.    
Soricomorpha Soricidae Least shrew Cryptotis parva Least concern Concentrated in the southwestern United States.  From Florida up to New York and reaches as far west as Texas and South Dakota. 957 43              
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Big Brown Bat Eptesicus fuscus Lower Risk (lc) Throughout the contiguous US and Alaska 39, 223 356 Lower Risk (lc)       TRIBE Eptesicini present in Fla. only as a winter migrant Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Eastern Red Bat Lasiurus borealis Lower Risk (lc) Central and eastern United States 40, 655, 815 183 Lower Risk (lc)       TRIBE Lasiurini present in Fla. only as a winter migrant Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Hoary Bat Lasiurus cinereus Lower Risk (lc) Throughout the contiguous United States and Hawaii 656, 041, 042 185 Lower Risk (lc)       TRIBE Lasiurini; *Status is Low Risk eith the exception of L. c. semotus solitary; often roosts in spanish moss Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Northern Yellow Bat Lasiurus intermedius Lower Risk (lc) Southeast United States and southeast Texas   132 Lower Risk (lc)       TRIBE Lasiurini solitary; often roosts in spanish moss Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Seminole Bat Lasiurus seminolus Lower Risk (lc) Florida and Texas to Oklahoma and Virginia, Pennsylvania and New York   280 Lower Risk (lc)       TRIBE Lasiurini frequently found in man-made structures Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Evening Bat Nycticeius humeralis Lower Risk (lc) Southern tip of Texas to Nebraska, the Great Lakes area, and Pennsylvania south to Florida and the Gulf Coast 232 23 Lower Risk (lc)       TRIBE Nycticeiini Florida's smallest bat Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Eastern Pipistrelle Perimyotis subflavus Lower Risk (lc) Eastern United States excluding Maine and southern Florida 38, 654 228 Lower Risk (lc)       TRIBE Pipistrellini    
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Rafinesque's Big-eared Bat Corynorhinus rafinesquii Vulnerable Southeastern United States 394 69 Vulnerable       TRIBE Plecotini; *Status is Vulnerable as Plecotus rafinesquii    
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Southeastern Myotis Myotis austroriparius Lower Risk (lc) Southeastern United States including Florida, north to Indiana and North Carolina, west to Texas and sooutheastern Oklahoma   332 Lower Risk (lc)            
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Gray Myotis Myotis grisescens Endangered Florida panhandle to Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, E Kansas and NE Oklahoma 228 510 Endangered            
Chiroptera Vespertilionidae Little Brown Myotis Myotis lucifugus Lower Risk (lc) Most of US, except Texas to Nebraska, and extreme southern portions of southern states 224, 225, 814 142 Lower Risk (lc)            
Chiroptera Phyllostomidae Jamaican Fruit-eating Bat Artibeus jamaicensis Lower Risk (lc) Perhaps Florida 812, 1195, 1518   Lower Risk (lc)       TRIBE Stenodermatini    
Chiroptera Molossidae Wagner's Bonneted Bat Eumops glaucinus Lower risk (lc) Florida 1542 551 Lower Risk (lc)            
Chiroptera Molossidae Palla's Mastiff Bat Molossus molossus Lower risk (lc) Florida Keys 811, 1545, 1546   Lower Risk (lc)            
Chiroptera Molossidae Brazilian/Mexican Free-tailed Bat Tadarida brasiliensis Lower Risk (nt) From Oregon to North Carolina and south 1549 331 Lower Risk (nt)            
Chiroptera Mormoopidae Pristine Moustached Bat Pteronotus pristinus Not evaluated Possibly Florida     Not evaluated         presence in Florida is uncertain Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Lagomorpha Leporidae Swamp Rabbit Sylvilagus aquaticus Lower Risk Southern Illinois and southwestern Indiana, southwestern Missouri to southeastern Kansas southward through extreme western Kentucky and western Tennessee to eastern Oklahoma, eastern Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and NW South Carolina.   151       Swamps, marshes and bottomlands. Active at dawn and in the late afternoon in spring and summer, mostly nocturnal in winter. Swims well, unlike most rabbits; very territorial. usually restricted to upland habitats; often rare in pine forests Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Lagomorpha Leporidae Eastern Cottontail Sylvilagus floridanus Lower Risk Northern, central, and western Venezuela and adjacent islands and adjacent Colombia through Central America (disjunct in part); to northwestern Mexico, Arizona, north and east to North Dakota, Minnesota, northern Michigan, New York and Massachusetts, Atlantic Coast south and Florida Gulf Coast west to Mexico; also southern Saskatchewan, southern Ontario and south central Quebec, Canada. 058, 953 136       Thickets and old fields, edges of hardwood forest, farmland, prairies and swamps. One of most familiar rabbits, mainly nocturnal but may be active and dawns or dusk. Sleeps under brush piles or in thickets or dense grass. usually restricted to wetland habitats Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Lagomorpha Leporidae Marsh Rabbit Sylvilagus palustris Endangered Florida to southeastern Virginia (Dismal Swamp) in coastal lowlands.   153       Brackish and freshwater marshes, edges of lakes and mangroves and other wet areas. Mainly nocturnal, but may be seen at dawn or dusk. Swims well and readily enters water when pursued; can walk on its hind legs. Habitat is brackish and freshwater marshes, edges of lakes and mangroves and other wet areas.    
Soricomorpha Soricidae Southeastern shrew Sorex longirostris Least concern Southeastern United States; East of the Mississippi River, north to central Illinois and Maryland.  According to species account there are a few records in Arkansas and Missouri.   143           fossorial  
Soricomorpha Talpidae Star-nosed mole Condylura cristata Least concern Geogria and north west South Carolina to Nova Scotia and Labrador; Great Lakes region to south eastern Manitoba. 649, 650 129         Unlike other moles, swims well and makes tunnels leading into water; also active on or under snow. May travel on the surface. Elsewhere makes deep burrows and throws up molehills. Habitat is wet areas in meadows, woods, swamps or streams, usually in mucky fossorial; tunnels often visible on surface  
Soricomorpha Talpidae Eastern mole Scalopus aquaticus Least concern Throughout south eastern United States north to Massachussetts to Minnesota. 647, 648 105         Throws up large molehills when excavating deep tunnels. Makes shallow burrows for feeding that may be used only once or may be used for several years. Preferes fields or woods with soft moist soils. Nocturnal Brown, L. N. 1997. Mammals of Florida. Windward Publishing, Miami, Florida, 224 pp. Burt, W. H., and R. P. Grossenheider. 1976. A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico. Third ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 289 pp
Didelphimorphia Didelphidae Virginia Opossum Didelphis virginiana least concern found everywhere except NV, MT, UT, ND, SD, WI, MN, WY 3, 4, 630, 828, 829, 830 40         Nocturnal, introduced to the western states in the early 1900s    
Cingulata Dasypodidae     Range has spread north & east since 1900 Nine-banded Armadillo Dasypus novemcinctus least concern NM, CO, TX, OK, NE, KS, MO, AR, LA, TN, MS, AL, GA, FL, SC, NC 53, 242 162         always born in litters of 4 identical (same sex) quadruplets    
Sirenia Trichechidae West Indian Manatee Trichechus manatus rare coastal marine areas, but not usually N of Suwannee R. in Gulf; enters rivers and connected springs 290, 291(BC), 292(A), 1139(S), 1140(S), 1141(S) 93              
Rodentia Myocastoridae Nutria Myocastor coypus common   1019 398         semiaquatic    
Cetacea Balaenidae North Atlantic Right Whale Eubalaena glacialis Endangered North Atlantic; temperate to tropical waters       no carnivore aquatic, marine Surfaces to blow about every 5-20 minutes; usually raises flukes as it descends. Eats small crustaceans including krill. Prefers waters close to shore.    
Cetacea alaenopteridae Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae U.S. ESA - Endangered; IUCN - Vulnerable Worldwide: cold-temperate to tropical waters 575, 576, 698, 768 604   no carnivore aquatic, marine Acrobatic; leap clear of water when breaching; frequently slaps water with flippers or tail. Feeds on schooling fish or krill; groups may cooperate to trap prey. In winter and summer, found in coastal areas or near islands; migrates through open oceans.    
Cetacea Delphinidae Atlantic Spotted Dolphin Stenella frontalis Data deficient Atlantic Ocean including the Gulf of Mexico: warm-temperate to tropical waters   702   no carnivore aquatic, marine Fast and agile; bow-rides and leaps out of the water. Coastal groups may number 1-15, offshore groups may be larger. Habitat is coastal and offshore waters.    
Cetacea Delphinidae Bottlenose Dolphin Tursiops truncatus Data deficient Worldwide: temperate to tropical waters, including the Black Sea 262     no carnivore aquatic, marine Attracted to boats and often bow-rides or travels at the stern. Sometimes acrobatic when feeding. Habitat is coastal, shelf and offshore waters, with separate populations in inshore and pelagic waters.    
Cetacea Phocoenidae Harbor Porpoise Phocoena phocoena Vulnerable N Pacific and N Atlantic: arctic to cold-temperate waters, isolated population in Black Sea; extends south to Senegal in the E Atlantic 1130, 1357 42   no carnivore aquatic, marine Shy and often difficult to approach. Seldom breaches, but many arc and splash when pursuing prey. Lives in cold coastal waters.