Open Access Articles

Boselaphus tragocamelus (Pallas, 1766) is a bovid commonly called the nilgai or blue bull and is Asia’s largest antelope. A sexually dimorphic ungulate of large stature and unique coloration, it...
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Leslie, D. M., Jr.. 2008. Boselaphus tragocamelus (Artiodactyla: Bovidae). Mammalian Species 813:1-16.
Many mammalian species exhibit intersexual differences in sociospatial behavior; however, sociality of adult males in species with solitary females is relatively rare. Male raccoons (Procyon lotor) i...
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Gehrt, S. D., W. F. Gergits, and E. K. Fritzell. 2008. Behavioral and genetic aspects of male social groups in raccoons. Journal of Mammalogy 89:1473-1480.
Pantholops hodgsonii (Abel, 1826) is a bovid commonly called the chiru or Tibetan antelope. Pantholops is...
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Leslie, D. M., Jr., and G. B. Schaller. 2008. Pantholops hodgsonii (Artiodactyla: Bovidae). Mammalian Species 817:1-13.
Mammalian chewing rate scales inversely to body mass (M); however, controversy exists over the value of the scaling exponent. Different mechanisms explain different values of the scaling exponent; hen...
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Gerstner, G. E., and J. B. Gerstein. 2008. Chewing rate allometry among mammals. Journal of Mammalogy 89:1020-1030.
The interpretation of isotopic data gathered in the field often demands knowing the rate at which isotopes are incorporated into different tissues and species, and the discrimination factor between ti...
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Martìnez del Rio, C., and S. A. Carelton. 2008. How fast and how faithful: the dynamics of isotopic incorporation into animal tissues. Journal of Mammalogy 93(2):353-359.
Choeroniscus minor (Peters, 1868) is a phyllostomid commonly called the lesser long-tongued bat. It is a medium-size bat with an elongated muzzle, a very long tongue, and other cranial and dental fe...
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Solmsen, E.-H., and H. Schliemann. 2008. Choeroniscus minor (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae). Mammalian Species 822:1-6.
We investigated movement patterns in a high-density population of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) to explore how the costs and benefits of dispersal and other forms of movement differed among individua...
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Macdonald, D. W., C. Newman, C. D. Buesching, and P. J. Johnson. 2008. Male-biased movement in a high-density population of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles). Journal of Mammalogy 89:1077-1086.
Jaguars (Panthera onca) remain virtually unstudied in the desert environments at the northern extent of their range. Historic sightings from the United States indicate a declining population of reside...
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McCain, E. B., and J. L. Childs. 2008. Evidence of resident jaguars (Panthera onca) in the southwestern United States and the implications for conservations. Journal of Mammalogy 89:1-10.
The earth’s climate is changing, possibly at an unprecedented rate. Overall, the planet is warming, sea ice and glaciers are in retreat, sea level is rising, and pollutants are accumulating in t...
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Moore, S. E.. 2008. Marine mammals as ecosystem sentinels. Journal of Mammalogy 89:534-540.
In the early 1980s, 2 groups of Soviet scientists independently described 1, possibly 2 new dwarf species of killer whales (Orcinus) from Antarctica. We used aerial photogrammetry to determine total l...
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Pitman, R. L., W. L. Perryman, and E. Eilers. 2007. A dwarf form of killer whale in Antarctica. Journal of Mammalogy 88(1):43-48.